Group Members:

Zarruh Egamov,

Gethro Dalce,

and Sean Abt

Map of the Maryland Colony
Map of the Maryland Colony

The Maryland Toleration Act

Most of the Maryland was Catholic, and the Maryland Toleration Act allowed freedom and worship for all Trinitarian Christians in Maryland, but death to anyone who denied the divinity of Jesus. The Maryland Toleration Act, also known as the Act Concerning Religion, was a law mandating religious tolerance for trinitarian Christians. Passed on April 21, 1649 by the assembly of the Maryland Colony, it was the second law requiring religious tolerance in the British North American colonies and created the first legal limitations on hate speech in the world.

The Maryland Toleration Act
The Maryland Toleration Act

Education in Maryland Colony

The education in Maryland varied upon the family status. The children of wealthy parents were educated by tutors employed by the wealthier families. On the other hand, the children of less wealthy parents attended a one room school with other children. They learned their lessons by repeating them over and over which was boring. Learning came by use of a hornbook. Which looked like a wooden paddle with a paper attached to it with letters, numbers and maybe a verse from the Bible on the paper. It was small and easy to handle. They forced the children to read the Bible.

They used these to learn how to read so they can read the bible
They used these to learn how to read so they can read the bible

Slavery in Maryland

In Maryland, slavery started in 1642. Tobacco demanded cheap labor to harvest and process the crop, the more so as tobacco prices declined in the late 1600's, even as farms became ever larger and more efficient. At first emigrants from England called indentured servants supplied much of the necessary labor. Later on they realized that Africans can do the same amount of work and forced them into labor. The First Africans were brought to Virginia in 1619. The first Africans imported to Maryland were in 1642. The slaves were used to harvest crops such as tobacco and cotton. The slave owners were able to make money off of them. The slaves did not get anything in return. In 1664, under the governorship of Charles Calvert, 3rd Baron Baltimore, the Assembly ruled that all slaves should be slaves for life, and that the children of slaves should also be enslaved for life.

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